AFOSI Det 226 helps local scouts earn badge

Special Agent Benjamin Tallman, OSI Detachment 226, Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., shows two cub scouts from a local cub scout den how to brush for fingerprints. The scouts were invited to the detachment to fulfill a requirement toward getting their "wolf badge." (U.S. Air Force Photo/OSI Det. 226)

Special Agent Benjamin Tallman, OSI Detachment 226, Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., shows two cub scouts from a local cub scout den how to brush for fingerprints. The scouts were invited to the detachment to fulfill a requirement toward getting their "wolf badge." (U.S. Air Force Photo/OSI Det. 226)

ELLSWORTH AIR FORCE BASE, S.D. -- Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 226, Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., recently turned their office into a den for the Box Elder Cub Scouts Wolf Den from Pack 28.

"This was a great opportunity for me to participate with my son, who's a part of the troop" said Special Agent Bojan Peterkovic, host for the Wolf Den visit. "Because of the fast tempo here, I'm not able to be as active with the troop as I'd like to be."

The Cub Scouts have four dens separated by grades, consisting of second-graders ages 7 and 8. In order to move to the next rank and earn their "wolf badge," these second-graders have 12 requirements to fulfill throughout the school year. Of the 12 requirements, the Wolf Den has already fulfilled seven of their tasks.

"At this rate, the boys should have their badge as early as February, three months ahead of schedule," said Ms. Tricia Burke, Wolf Den leader.

One of their requirements was to visit a government office, and that's where OSI came in. Peterkovic gave a tour of the OSI facility, a brief speech on what he does as a special agent, and opened the floor for questions. According to most of the Cub Scouts, the highlight of the tour came when Peterkovic and Special Agent Benjamin Tallman pulled out their investigative kits.

"Their toys are so cool, dad," said Spencer Stone, Wolf den Cub scout to his dad, Master Sgt. Carroll Stone, 28th Security Forces Squadron. "This is so much fun."

Tallman and Peterkovic demonstrated how they're able to lift fingerprints that are invisible to the naked eye. The Cub Scouts were able to tape off a "crime scene" and take photos of their evidence. The newly-minted junior agents were even able to lift DNA left behind from their unknown subject.

Burke, who had limited experience with the military before, enjoyed her visit.

"I thought the tour was fantastic," she said. "It was definitely like something you'd see on CSI, very cool."

The Scouts ended the tour with a salute in front of the American Flag reciting the Pledge of Allegiance.