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RAF Mildenhall agencies practice crime scene processing

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alexandra West, 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs broadcast journalist, documents a photo identifier before going into a simulated crime scene during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training included members of Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, 100th Security Forces Squadron Intelligence and Investigations unit and 100th ARW Public Affairs, who worked together to compare and develop crime scene processing skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

Senior Airman Alexandra West, 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs broadcast journalist, documents a photo identifier before going into a simulated crime scene during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training included members of Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, the 100th Security Forces Squadron Intelligence and Investigations unit and 100th ARW Public Affairs, who worked together to compare and develop crime scene processing skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

U.S. Air Force Special Agent Mark Stuetzel, Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, briefs Airmen during crime scene investigation processing training session at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. This was the first time the three agencies came together to conduct crime scene investigation training at RAF Mildenhall. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

Special Agent Mark Stuetzel, Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, briefs Airmen during crime scene investigation processing training at RAF Mildenhall, United Kingdom, Aug. 1, 2018. This marked the first time AFOSI, the 100th Security Forces Squadron and 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs joined forces to conduct crime scene investigation training at RAF Mildenhall. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kelly O’Connor, 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs broadcast journalist, takes a photo of a simulated dead body during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training consisted of three different agencies, Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, 100th Security Forces Squadron Intelligence and Investigations unit and 100th ARW Public Affairs, training together for the first time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

Senior Airman Kelly O’Connor, 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs broadcast journalist, photographs a simulated dead body during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training brought Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, the 100th Security Forces Squadron Intelligence and Investigations unit and 100th ARW Public Affairs together for the first time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

U.S. Air Force Special Agent Takyee Ho, Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, places a ruler alongside evidence during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training included forensic photography and fingerprint collection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

Special Agent Takyee Ho, Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512, places a ruler alongside evidence during crime scene processing training at RAF Mildenhall, England, Aug. 1, 2018. The training included forensic photography and fingerprint collection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Luke Milano)

RAF MILDENHALL, United Kingdom --

The room is silent and ominous. Blood is spattered on the wall, discarded weapons are scattered around the floor and a body lies motionless in the corner.

What sounds like a scene found from a crime drama, is in fact a training scenario.

Airmen from 100th Security Forces Squadron Intelligence and Investigations conducted crime scene processing training with Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 512 and 100th Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs for the first time here, Aug. 1, 2018.

“During this training we can walk the photographer through what we need from them when we process a crime scene,” said Investigator Alaina Howard, 100th SFS NCO in charge of intelligence and investigations. “It’s a way for our agencies to communicate together, so at the end of the day the justice system can do its job.”

The training used vignette-based scenarios, along with simulated evidence and corpses to produce a more realistic training environment for the Airmen and lead to better collaboration among the three agencies.

Howard said each of the agencies have their own skill sets for performing a crime scene investigation. This training allowed the agencies to share knowledge and compare methods.

"Processing a crime scene is more than just documentation," Howard said. "There are procedures that must be followed when entering the area.

"The OSI special agents covered every angle of crime scene photography, from capturing fingerprints to drops of blood. I appreciate them sharing their expertise with us," said Senior Airman Kelly O'Connor, 100th ARW Public Affairs broadcast journalist. "Thankfully I’ve never had to respond to a homicide, but if one occurs, I’m ready to support."

The continuing training among the three agencies is designed to build on a strong foundation.

“By conducting this training we can be more involved, be more detailed and sharpen our tools,” Howard said.